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Monday, November 12, 2018

It’s Monday, What are You Reading? The Wicked Trade


It’s Monday, What are You Reading? 
The Wicked Trade 
(The Forensic Genealogist Book 7)
by Nathan Dylan Goodwin
 

This post is the one-hundred and fifty-seventh entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]

I have read this series of books (mostly novellas, really) on Kindle Editions in recent days, still working through Book 7, here. I am counting them here as ‘one read’ because that is essentially what I did. They are each/all well worth the read, in my opinion. Very interesting insight into British life as well as some fascinating British history… and the genealogical research is interesting, as well. What fun!! ;-) I include his personal information below, because it is of interest, as well.

P.S. While they can be read as stand-alone, I would definitely recommend starting with No. 1 to get the most benefit of the major continuing story about Morton's own life - it is really as good as the cases he works on...  ;-)


Book Description from Amazon:

When Morton Farrier is presented with a case revolving around a mysterious letter written by disreputable criminal, Ann Fothergill in 1827, he quickly finds himself delving into a shadowy Georgian underworld of smuggling and murder on the Kent and Sussex border. Morton must use his skills as a forensic genealogist to untangle Ann’s association with the notorious Aldington Gang and also with the brutal killing of Quartermaster Richard Morgan. As his research continues, Morton suspects that his client’s family might have more troubling and dangerous expectations of his findings.

This is the seventh book in the Morton Farrier genealogical crime mystery series, although it can be enjoyed as a stand-alone story.

For updates on Nathan Dylan Goodwin's releases:
Website & newsletter: www.nathandylangoodwin.com
Twitter: @NathanDGoodwin
Facebook: www.facebook.com/nathandylangoodwin
Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/dylan0470/
Blog: theforensicgenealogist.blogspot.co.uk


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, October 15, 2018

It’s Monday, What are You Reading? President’s of War


It’s Monday, What are You Reading? President’s of War: 
The Epic Story, From 1807 to Modern Times
by Michael Beschloss
 


This post is the one-hundred and fifty-sixth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]


This is a must read for a presidential history nerd like me. I just had to have it. The first ten or so pages have already justified my interest, talking about Thomas Jefferson and James Madison…


Book Description from Amazon:

From a preeminent presidential historian comes a groundbreaking and often surprising saga of America’s wartime chief executives


Ten years in the research and writing, Presidents of War is a fresh, magisterial, intimate look at a procession of American leaders as they took the nation into conflict and mobilized their country for victory. It brings us into the room as they make the most difficult decisions that face any President, at times sending hundreds of thousands of American men and women to their deaths.

From James Madison and the War of 1812 to recent times, we see them struggling with Congress, the courts, the press, their own advisors and antiwar protesters; seeking comfort from their spouses, families and friends; and dropping to their knees in prayer. We come to understand how these Presidents were able to withstand the pressures of war—both physically and emotionally—or were broken by them.

Beschloss’s interviews with surviving participants in the drama and his findings in original letters, diaries, once-classified national security documents, and other sources help him to tell this story in a way it has not been told before. Presidents of War combines the sense of being there with the overarching context of two centuries of American history. This important book shows how far we have traveled from the time of our Founders, who tried to constrain presidential power, to our modern day, when a single leader has the potential to launch nuclear weapons that can destroy much of the human race.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, September 17, 2018

It’s Monday, What are You Reading? Fear



It’s Monday, What are You Reading? 
Fear: Trump in the White House 
by Bob Woodward
 


This post is the one-hundred and fifty-fifth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]

I’m about half way through as I read this, and there is little we didn’t know, outside the first few promo blurbs and Woodward interview comments. However, I always enjoy reading well researched ‘inside’ stories, and this certain qualifies.


Book Description from Amazon:

THE INSIDE STORY ON PRESIDENT TRUMP, AS ONLY BOB WOODWARD CAN TELL IT


With authoritative reporting honed through eight presidencies from Nixon to Obama, author Bob Woodward reveals in unprecedented detail the harrowing life inside President Donald Trump’s White House and precisely how he makes decisions on major foreign and domestic policies. Woodward draws from hundreds of hours of interviews with firsthand sources, meeting notes, personal diaries, files and documents. The focus is on the explosive debates and the decision-making in the Oval Office, the Situation Room, Air Force One and the White House residence.

Fear is the most intimate portrait of a sitting president ever published during the president’s first years in office.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, September 3, 2018

It’s Monday, What are You Reading? A History of the Ozarks, Vol. 1


It’s Monday, What are You Reading?
A History of the Ozarks: 
Vol. 1, The Old Ozarks
by Brooks Blevins


This post is the one-hundred and fifty-fourth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]

It is interesting how some books just come along at the right time. This seems to be one. 2nd chapter on Native American tribes moving through in late 1700s to 1820s, especially interesting to me with my fiction work. Good background. My previous research was good, just not in depth. This fills in some detail that was useful.


Book Description from Amazon:

Geologic forces raised the Ozarks. Myth enshrouds these hills. Human beings shaped them and were shaped by them. The Ozarks reflect the epic tableau of the American people—the native Osage and would-be colonial conquerors, the determined settlers and on-the-make speculators, the endless labors of hardscrabble farmers and capitalism of visionary entrepreneurs. The Old Ozarks is the first volume of a monumental three-part history of the region and its inhabitants. Brooks Blevins begins in deep prehistory, charting how these highlands of granite, dolomite, and limestone came to exist. From there he turns to the political and economic motivations behind the eagerness of many peoples to possess the Ozarks. Blevins places these early proto-Ozarkers within the context of larger American history and the economic, social, and political forces that drove it forward. But he also tells the varied and colorful human stories that fill the region's storied past—and contribute to the powerful myths and misunderstandings that even today distort our views of the Ozarks' places and people. A sweeping history in the grand tradition, A History of the Ozarks, Volume 1: The Old Ozarks is essential reading for anyone who cares about the highland heart of America.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, August 6, 2018

It’s Monday, What are You Reading? The President is Missing: A Novel



It’s Monday, What are You Reading? 
The President is Missing: A Novel
by James Patterson and Bill Clinton
 


This post is the one-hundred and fifty-third entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]

So. I wasn’t going to get this one. Then I read a promo article in the AARP Magazine about the process they went through in collaborating and actually writing. I was hooked. Love to read about the inner workings of the White House. Not disappointed. Excellent thriller, page-turner. Hated to ever lay it down. Finished it last night, wayyyyy ahead of what I planned to. ;-)


Book Description from Amazon:

"President Duncan for a second term!" --USA Today
"This book's a big one." --New York Times
"Towers above most political thrillers." --Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
"The plotting is immaculate . . . the writing is taut." --Sunday Times (London)
"Ambitious and wildly readable." --New York Times Book Review


The President Is Missing confronts a threat so huge that it jeopardizes not just Pennsylvania Avenue and Wall Street, but all of America. Uncertainty and fear grip the nation. There are whispers of cyberterror and espionage and a traitor in the Cabinet. Even the President himself becomes a suspect, and then he disappears from public view . . .

Set over the course of three days, The President Is Missing sheds a stunning light upon the inner workings and vulnerabilities of our nation. Filled with information that only a former Commander-in-Chief could know, this is the most authentic, terrifying novel to come along in many years.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, July 23, 2018

It’s Monday, What are You Reading? Little House, Long Shadow



It’s Monday, What are You Reading?
Little House, Long Shadow: 
Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Impact on American Culture
by Anita Clair Fellman


This post is the one-hundred and fifty-second entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]

This is a 2008 book that we've had for quite a while. As you've likely noticed, I've been working my way through several books by scholars on the various aspects of the impact of the Little House books. This one relates to the impact on our culture. It is a fascinating phenomena... fun reading to me. P.S. this book was actually compiled over decades. That makes in interesting, as well.


Book Description from Amazon:

Beyond their status as classic children’s stories, Laura Ingalls Wilder’s Little House books play a significant role in American culture that most people cannot begin to appreciate. Millions of children have sampled the books in school; played out the roles of Laura and Mary; or visited Wilder homesites with their parents, who may be fans themselves. Yet, as Anita Clair Fellman shows, there is even more to this magical series with its clear emotional appeal: a covert political message that made many readers comfortable with the resurgence of conservatism in the Reagan years and beyond.
In Little House, Long Shadow, a leading Wilder scholar offers a fresh interpretation of the Little House books that examines how this beloved body of children’s literature found its way into many facets of our culture and consciousness—even influencing the responsiveness of Americans to particular political views. Because both Wilder and her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane, opposed the New Deal programs being implemented during the period in which they wrote, their books reflect their use of family history as an argument against the state’s protection of individuals from economic uncertainty. Their writing emphasized the isolation of the Ingalls family and the family’s resilience in the face of crises and consistently equated self-sufficiency with family acceptance, security, and warmth.
Fellman argues that the popularity of these books—abetted by Lane’s overtly libertarian views—helped lay the groundwork for a negative response to big government and a positive view of political individualism, contributing to the acceptance of contemporary conservatism while perpetuating a mythic West. Beyond tracing the emergence of this influence in the relationship between Wilder and her daughter, Fellman explores the continuing presence of the books—and their message—in modern cultural institutions from classrooms to tourism, newspaper editorials to Internet message boards.
Little House, Long Shadow shows how ostensibly apolitical artifacts of popular culture can help explain shifts in political assumptions. It is a pioneering look at the dissemination of books in our culture that expands the discussion of recent political transformations—and suggests that sources other than political rhetoric have contributed to Americans’ renewed appreciation of individualist ideals.



Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, July 16, 2018

It’s Monday, What are You Reading? President Carter


It’s Monday, What are You Reading?
President Carter: The White House Years
by Stuart E. Eizenstat
 


 This post is the one-hundred and fifty-first entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]


OK, I became aware of this book from an ad on my timeline feed on Facebook! But, I remember Stuart Eizenstat and decided this would be a good match with my other recent readings. I’ve always been ‘fascinated’ by Carter - like a lot, disagree some, puzzled by other - and, it is a Presidential Biography. Stuart is admittedly wanting to boost Carter’s image some 40 years out… taking that into account as I attack the 997 page hard copy!!! ;-)


Book Description from Amazon:

The definitive history of the Carter Administration from the man who participated in its surprising number of accomplishments―drawing on his extensive and never-before-seen notes.

 
Stuart Eizenstat was at Jimmy Carter’s side from his political rise in Georgia through four years in the White House, where he served as Chief Domestic Policy Adviser. He was directly involved in all domestic and economic decisions as well as in many foreign policy ones. Famous for the legal pads he took to every meeting, he draws on more than 5,000 pages of notes and 350 interviews of all the major figures of the time, to write the comprehensive history of an underappreciated president―and to give an intimate view on how the presidency works.
Eizenstat reveals the grueling negotiations behind Carter’s peace between Israel and Egypt, what led to the return of the Panama Canal, and how Carter made human rights a presidential imperative. He follows Carter’s passing of America’s first comprehensive energy policy, and his deregulation of the oil, gas, transportation, and communications industries. And he details the creation of the modern vice-presidency.
Eizenstat also details Carter’s many missteps, including the Iranian Hostage Crisis, because Carter’s desire to do the right thing, not the political thing, often hurt him and alienated Congress. His willingness to tackle intractable problems, however, led to major, long-lasting accomplishments.
This major work of history shows first-hand where Carter succeeded, where he failed, and how he set up many successes of later presidents.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)