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Monday, August 24, 2015

It's Monday, What are You Reading? The Great Agnostic


It's Monday, What are You Reading? 
The  Great Agnostic:
Robert Ingersoll and American Forethought 
by Susan Jacoby


This post is the ninety-sixth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]


I’ve wanted to read a book about Ingersoll for a long time. This one recently came to my attention via Bill Moyers blog post. Very useful reading, for sure.




Book Description from Amazon:

A biography that restores America’s foremost nineteenth-century champion of reason and secularism to our still contested twenty-first-century public square

Amazon Editorial Reviews:

"'Jacoby's goal of elucidating the life and work of Robert Ingersoll is admirably accomplished. She offers a host of well-chosen quotations from his work, and she deftly displays the effect he had on others. For instance: after a young Eugene V. Debs heard Ingersoll talk, Debs accompanied him to the train station and then - just so he could continue the conversation - bought himself a ticket and rode all the way from Terre Haute to Cincinnati. Readers today may well find Ingersoll's company equally entrancing.' (Jennifer Michael Hecht, The New York Times Book Review)
'Jacoby writes with wit and vigor, affectionately resurrecting a man whose life and work are due for reconsideration.' (Kate Tuttle, The Boston Globe)"


For more information on Robert Ingersoll:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_G._Ingersoll



Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, July 13, 2015

It's Monday, What are You Reading? The Quartet

It's Monday, What are You Reading? 
The Quartet:
Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789 
by Joseph J. Ellis 
This post is the ninety-fifth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]



Great birthday gift! Thanks, Annette! ;-) Actually reading it on my iPhone!! ;-)

Book Description from Amazon:

From Pulitzer Prize–winning American historian Joseph J. Ellis, the unexpected story of why the thirteen colonies, having just fought off the imposition of a distant centralized governing power, would decide to subordinate themselves anew.

We all know the famous opening phrase of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address: “Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this Continent a new Nation.” The truth is different. In 1776, thirteen American colonies declared themselves independent states that only temporarily joined forces in order to defeat the British. Once victorious, they planned to go their separate ways. The triumph of the American Revolution was neither an ideological nor a political guarantee that the colonies would relinquish their independence and accept the creation of a federal government with power over their autonomy as states.

The Quartet is the story of this second American founding and of the men most responsible—George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison. These men, with the help of Robert Morris and Gouverneur Morris, shaped the contours of American history by diagnosing the systemic dysfunctions created by the Articles of Confederation, manipulating the political process to force the calling of the Constitutional Convention, conspiring to set the agenda in Philadelphia, orchestrating the debate in the state ratifying conventions, and, finally, drafting the Bill of Rights to assure state compliance with the constitutional settlement.

Ellis has given us a gripping and dramatic portrait of one of the most crucial and misconstrued periods in American history: the years between the end of the Revolution and the formation of the federal government. The Quartet unmasks a myth, and in its place presents an even more compelling truth—one that lies at the heart of understanding the creation of the United States of America.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Book Giveaway


Book Giveaway




Many of you reading this have already received your free PDF copy of my 23K word eBook, “The Kings of Oak Springs, Vol. One” (Some say it reminds them of a ‘Little House’ story)… for signing up for the free Dr. Bill’s  “The Homeplace Saga” Newsletter.


Join us in discussing family saga and family-related story-telling and reading... ! ;-)

You can still get your free PDF copy today, by simply signing up here with name and email address:
http://eepurl.com/bpPujv

If you share this URL with your friends, and they sign up, they will also receive the free PDF.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Birthday (July 1) - 4th of July Special Offer


Birthday (July 1) - 4th of July Special Offer
 

I made this offer on Facebook, and was pleasantly surprised how many people signed up!
I want to extend it to all my readers, in case you missed it:

I will send you a free PDF of my 23K word eBook, “The Kings of Oak Springs, Vol. One” (Some say it reminds them of a ‘Little House’ story) when you sign up for my free: Dr. Bill’s “The Homeplace Saga” Newsletter. Sign up here today (free): http://eepurl.com/bpPujv

Happy Reading,

Dr. Bill ;-)

Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Suggested read for the day... and the summer...


 Suggested read for the day... and the summer...





Read a 'Weston Wagons West' historical fiction story today...

Here is an update of the 64 story suite of tales, chronicling the author's ancestors from the 1600s to the 1900s...


http://hub.me/ajBBs


Happy Reading,

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, June 15, 2015

It's Monday, What are You Reading? American Insurgents


It's Monday, What are You Reading?
American Insurgents, American Patriots: 
The Revolution of the People 
by T.H.Breen


This post is the ninety-fourth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]




This book sat on my shelf for nearly five years, it appears… don’t know why. It is a fascinating, new approach, to the American Revolution, that I enjoy so much! The author, a history professor, has written several books on the period.
 

Book Description from Amazon:

Before there could be a revolution, there was a rebellion; before patriots, there were insurgents. Challenging and displacing decades of received wisdom, T. H. Breen's strikingly original book explains how ordinary Americans--most of them members of farm families living in small communities--were drawn into a successful insurgency against imperial authority. This is the compelling story of our national political origins that most Americans do not know. It is a story of rumor, charity, vengeance, and restraint. American Insurgents, American Patriots reminds us that revolutions are violent events. They provoke passion and rage, a willingness to use violence to achieve political ends, a deep sense of betrayal, and a strong religious conviction that God expects an oppressed people to defend their rights. The American Revolution was no exception.

A few celebrated figures in the Continental Congress do not make for a revolution. It requires tens of thousands of ordinary men and women willing to sacrifice, kill, and be killed. Breen not only gives the history of these ordinary Americans but, drawing upon a wealth of rarely seen documents, restores their primacy to American independence. Mobilizing two years before the Declaration of Independence, American insurgents in all thirteen colonies concluded that resistance to British oppression required organized violence against the state. They channeled popular rage through elected committees of safety and observation, which before 1776 were the heart of American resistance. American Insurgents, American Patriots is the stunning account of their insurgency, without which there would have been no independent republic as we know it.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, March 9, 2015

It's Monday, What are You Reading? James Madison


It's Monday, What are You Reading?
James Madison:
A Life Reconsidered
by Lynne Cheney



This post is the ninety-third entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]


This is the final book from Christmas, off my Wish List, from my family. I’ve read a James Madison biography, before, so wanted to read this one, but was in no hurry to get there. Now that I’ve finished John Quincy Adams, again, it is time for “Jemmy” - as his parents and wife called him! ;-)

http://www.amazon.com/James-Madison-Reconsidered-Lynne-Cheney-ebook/dp/B00G3L0ZUU/
[I don’t get a commission… this link just takes you directly to the Amazon.com listing.]


Book Description from Amazon:

A major new biography of the fourth president of the United States by New York Times bestselling author Lynne Cheney

This majestic new biography of James Madison explores the astonishing story of a man of vaunted modesty who audaciously changed the world. Among the Founding Fathers, Madison was a true genius of the early republic.

Outwardly reserved, Madison was the intellectual driving force behind the Constitution and crucial to its ratification. His visionary political philosophy and rationale for the union of states—so eloquently presented in The Federalist papers—helped shape the country Americans live in today.

Along with Thomas Jefferson, Madison would found the first political party in the country’s history—the Democratic Republicans. As Jefferson’s secretary of state, he managed the Louisiana Purchase, doubling the size of the United States. As president, Madison led the country in its first war under the Constitution, the War of 1812. Without precedent to guide him, he would demonstrate that a republic could defend its honor and independence—and remain a republic still.



Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)