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Monday, April 3, 2017

It's Monday, What are You Reading? The Cardinal Way


It's Monday, What are You Reading? The Cardinal Way:
How One Team Embraced Tradition and Moneybag at the Same Time 
by Howard Medal
 
This post is the one-hundred and twenty-third entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]
 



This is the third of the three Wish List books I received for Christmas. Even though a year old, just in time for the start of the 2017 Major League Baseball Season and the Cardinals - watching the Cubs at the Cardinals on opening night, as I write this…


Book Description from Amazon:

The St. Louis Cardinals have experienced the kind of success that is rare in baseball. Regarded by many as the premier organization in Major League Baseball, they not only win, but do so with an apparently bottomless pool of talent, one that is mostly homegrown.
Despite years of phenomenal achievements, including going to the World Series in 2004 and again in 2006, the Cardinals reinvented themselves using the "Cardinal Way," a term that has come to represent many things to fans, media, and other organizations, from an ironclad code of conduct to the team's cutting-edge use of statistic and analytics, and a farm system that has transformed baseball.
Baseball journalist Howard Megdal takes fans behind the scenes and off the field, interviewing dozens of key players within the Cardinals organization, including owner Bill DeWitt and the general manager John Mozeliak. Megdal reveals how the players are assessed and groomed using an unrivaled player development system that has created a franchise that is the envy of the baseball world.
In the spirit of Moneyball, The Cardinals Way tells an in-depth, fascinating story about a consistently good franchise, the business of sports in the twenty-first century and a team that has learned how to level the playing field, turning in season after successful season.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, February 27, 2017

It's Monday, What are You Reading? The Gatekeepers


It's Monday, What are You Reading? 
The Gatekeepers: How the White House Chiefs of Staff 
Define Every Presidency 
by Chris Whipple
 


This post is the one-hundred and twenty-second entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]

This is a book in the Advanced Readers Program with LibraryThing.


Book Description from Amazon:

The first in-depth, behind-the-scenes look at the White House Chiefs of Staff, whose actions—and inactions—have defined the course of our country

What do Dick Cheney and Rahm Emanuel have in common? Aside from polarizing personalities, both served as chief of staff to the president of the United States—as did Donald Rumsfeld, Leon Panetta, and a relative handful of others. The chiefs of staff, often referred to as "the gatekeepers," wield tremendous power in Washington and beyond; they decide who is allowed to see the president, negotiate with Congress to push POTUS's agenda, and—most crucially—enjoy unparalleled access to the leader of the free world. Each chief can make or break an administration, and each president reveals himself by the chief he picks.

Through extensive, intimate interviews with all seventeen living chiefs and two former presidents, award-winning journalist and producer Chris Whipple pulls back the curtain on this unique fraternity. In doing so, he revises our understanding of presidential history, showing us how James Baker’s expert managing of the White House, the press, and Capitol Hill paved the way for the Reagan Revolution—and, conversely, how Watergate, the Iraq War, and even the bungled Obamacare rollout might have been prevented by a more effective chief.

Filled with shrewd analysis and never-before-reported details, The Gatekeepers offers an essential portrait of the toughest job in Washington.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, February 20, 2017

It's Monday, What are You Reading? Jackson, Crockett and Houston


It's Monday, What are You Reading?
Jackson, Crockett and Houston
on the American Frontier 
by Paul Williams


This post is the one-hundred and twenty-first entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]

This is a book in the Early Reviewers Program with LibraryThing.


Book Description from Amazon:

The 1813 storming of Fort Mims by Creek Indians brought to light the careers of Andrew Jackson, David Crockett and Sam Houston. All three fought the Creeks and each would have his part to play two decades later when the Alamo was stormed during the fight for Texan independence from Mexico.
President Jackson was the first head of state to recognize the fledgling Republic of Texas. Colonel Crockett would be enshrined as a folk hero for his stand at the Alamo. General Houston won Texan independence at San Jacinto in 1836.
This book tells the stories of the two landmark battles—at Fort Mims and the Alamo—and the interwoven lives of Jackson, Crockett and Houston, three of the most fascinating men in American history.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, February 6, 2017

It's Monday, What are You Reading? At All Costs


It's Monday, What are You Reading? 
At All Costs
by Matt Pretty
 

This post is the one-hundred and twentith entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]


This is the book about the Medal of Honor winner that I shared on my family history blog here:
http://drbilltellsancestorstories.blogspot.com/2017/01/what-can-happen-when-you-share-history.html

My wife ordered the book from Amazon, both in hard copy and for our Kindles. The next day, Cory, the son, as part of an ongoing email exchange with me, noted that he had ‘gotten our order, and was sending it with a special gift.’ I realized later that the book was coming from the Foundation the family had set up and Cory was doing the mailing, himself, on behalf of the foundation, as part of that work (http://www.chiefetchbergerfoundation.org/). The ‘special gift’ that came along with the hard copy book was a numbered Foundation Challenge Coin (http://www.chiefetchbergerfoundation.org/support-the-foundation.html). In addition, there was a special inscription in the book, signed by Cory. Further, each copy of the book was also signed by the author, and by the two men CMSGT Etchberger saved as they evacuated Lima Site 85-Laos, just before he was killed during the escape. One of those men, Stan, was also on the other side of me, the tall one, in the RBS Express photo. He died a few years ago, but obviously signed the books prior to that time.

A very special book, very special people, and now, additional special memories.


Book Description from Amazon:

The remarkable true story of a career GI’s leading role in a secret radar mission, the resolve he demonstrates during an attack on his mountaintop camp—-and the 42-year quest for America to recognize his actions.
In 1967, after 16 years in uniform, Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Dick Etchberger is starting to make plans for a post-military life when he is invited to participate in a clandestine Vietnam War mission. There’s a catch, though: he must accept the assignment before he’s told of the location. Etchberger quickly agrees to this condition and is sent to Southeast Asia with two dozen other Air Force technicians to run a secret radar site atop a remote peak.
Posing as civilian contract workers, the men use an early computer to direct pilots to hit targets with greater accuracy regardless of visibility. Their operation, Project Heavy Green, has the blessing of the highest levels of Washington, D.C., as President Lyndon B. Johnson hopes improved bombing results will coax North Vietnam to negotiate an end to the war.
The mission is initially successful, though the team’s presence on the mountain is known almost immediately. The enemy soon launches a bizarre aerial assault on the camp. It is largely ineffective. A later ground attack, however, is not and results in the Air Force’s greatest loss of ground personnel in the war. Etchberger’s actions lead to the survival of three men, but not his own.
With eyewitnesses to Etchberger’s courage, why did it take four decades for the U.S. to recognize him with the nation’s highest award for military valor? Because they took place in Laos, a country officially neutral toward the neighboring war and off-limits to outside forces. Presenting him the Medal of Honor was impossible as it would have exposed U.S. presence there. It would take decades—and an improbable pathway—to reach this objective.
So begins the second phase of this remarkable story.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, January 16, 2017

It's Monday, What are You Reading? Madison’s Gift




It's Monday, What are You Reading? 
Madison’s Gift: 
Five Partnerships that Built America
by David O. Stewart
 

This post is the one-hundred and nineteenth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]


This is the second of the three books I received this Christmas, from my Wish List. Thanks, family!!
James Madison is now probably my ‘favorite’ of the ‘Founders’ - this book, focused on five ‘partnership’ that created his legacy, should be fun and interesting read.

Book Descriptions from Amazon:

Historian David O. Stewart restores James Madison to his proper place as the most significant Founding Father and framer of the new nation: “A fascinating look at how one unlikely figure managed to help guide…a precarious confederation of reluctant states to a self-governing republic that has prospered for more than two centuries” (Richmond Times-Dispatch).

Short, plain, balding, neither soldier nor orator, low on charisma and high on intelligence, James Madison cared more about achieving results than taking the credit. Forming key partnerships with Washington, Jefferson, Monroe, and his wife Dolley, Madison achieved his lifelong goal of a self-governing constitutional republic. It was Madison who led the drive for the Constitutional Convention and pressed for an effective new government as his patron George Washington lent the effort legitimacy; Madison who wrote the Federalist Papers with Alexander Hamilton to secure the Constitution’s ratification; Madison who joined Thomas Jefferson to found the nation’s first political party and move the nation toward broad democratic principles; Madison, with James Monroe, who guided the new nation through its first war in 1812, and who handed the reins of government to the last of the Founders.

But it was his final partnership that allowed Madison to escape his natural shyness and reach the greatest heights. Dolley was the woman he married in middle age and who presided over both him and an enlivened White House. This partnership was a love story, a unique one that sustained Madison through his political rise, his presidency, and a fruitful retirement. In Madison’s Gift, David O. Stewart’s “insights are illuminating….He weaves vivid, sometimes poignant details throughout the grand sweep of historical events. He brings early history alive in a way that offers today’s readers perspective” (Christian Science Monitor).


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)

Monday, January 2, 2017

It's Monday, What are You Reading? Nation Builder



It's Monday, What are You Reading?
Nation Builder: John Quincy Adams 
and the Grand Strategy of the Republic
by Charles N. Edel



This post is the one-hundred and eighteenth entry for this meme suggested by Sheila@ One Persons Journey Through A World of Books. [Entries 22-25 in the series were posted at  the Dr. Bill Tells Ancestor Stories]

This is the first of three books I received this Christmas, from my Wish List. Thanks, family!!
I love to read about John Quincy Adams… conversed with Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, in Paris, as a youngster… sat in Congress with Abraham Lincoln. Remarkable person… and life!! ;-)

Book Description from Amazon:

America’s rise from revolutionary colonies to a world power is often treated as inevitable. But Charles N. Edel’s provocative biography of John Q. Adams argues that he served as the central architect of a grand strategy whose ideas and policies made him a critical link between the founding generation and the Civil War–era nation of Lincoln.


Happy Reading!

Dr. Bill  ;-)